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#755638 - 01/25/12 02:47 PM Lack of Motion Induced Blindness
doc47 Offline
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Registered: 09/06/01
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Loc: Kafountine, Senegal
My apologies if this has been covered before.
This subject came to me by email this morning and is excellent advice. It brings to mind all the reading I did as a young guy about WW II fighter pilots and how they were constantly moving their heads, swiveling their necks. One writer even commented that the reason they wore silk scarves was to prevent their necks from chafing on their flying jackets from all the constant motion.

Good info and demo. Lack of motion Induced Blindness was presented as a flying issue, but one can also miss things while riding, so, keep your heads and eyes moving. The below link is a great illustration of what was taught about scanning outside the cockpit. Military pilots are taught to scan the horizon for a short distance, stop momentarily, and repeat the process.

This is the most effective technique to locate other aircraft. It is emphasized repeatedly not to fix one's gaze for more than a couple of seconds on any single object. The instructors, some of whom are combat veterans with years of experience, instruct pilots to continually "keep your eyes moving and head on a swivel" because this is the best way to survive, not only in combat, but from peacetime hazards (like a midair collision) as well.

The most dangerous target is the one that has NO apparent motion. This is the one you will hit without evasive action and also the one you will NOT see as presented below.



Link

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#755641 - 01/25/12 02:55 PM Re: Lack of Motion Induced Blindness [Re: doc47]
Living the Dream Online
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The technique is not only taught to pilots, but to grunts on the ground, especially for night ops. Staring into the darkness will net you less visible objects. The constant scanning, you pick up on "things" that go boom in the night. Another that is taught is to off-set your sight as when you do pick up an object in the dark with your sight, look to the left or right of it and you will make out the object in a more clear fashion.
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#755663 - 01/25/12 05:14 PM Re: Lack of Motion Induced Blindness [Re: Living the Dream]
doc47 Offline
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Registered: 09/06/01
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Loc: Kafountine, Senegal
Our nervous systems are hard-wired to detect motion. Stationary objects don't attract attention (unless it's that parked Volkswagen I'm about to hit!).

(Nice-looking women are, of course, an exception, even if motionless.)

The part of the retina that we use all the time, in the center of our vision, is loaded with cone cells. These are fine-grained and register color. The surrounding area has rod-cells. These transmit only black-white images to the brain but are much more sensitive to low levels of light. Hence, looking slightly away from the object at night allows the image to fall on the rod-cells. Color is no use in low-light situations. The rod-cells, however, can't define an image as well as cone cells. The image will appear more hazy/blurry.

Probably more than anybody needed to know.....


Edited by doc47 (01/25/12 05:16 PM)
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#755812 - 01/26/12 09:29 AM Re: Lack of Motion Induced Blindness [Re: doc47]
Horse Offline
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Registered: 02/13/07
Posts: 148
Loc: Blighty
Originally Posted By: doc47
The most dangerous target is the one that has NO apparent motion. This is the one you will hit without evasive action


There's an effect known as 'constant bearing (or heading), which shows that if two vehicles are travelling on different paths, but each is on a constant heading when viewed from the other, they will hit. Unfortunately, a constant heading is the worst for obscuration (muck on a driver's screen, blind spot in the eye, hidden by 'A' pillar, etc.

Plus, being a 'fixed point' against a background is really bad from the conspicuity point of view - a point used by some creatures when hunting - eg dragonflies will move against the background as their prey moves, so they remain 'fixed'!

So, to make yourself more visible when approaching junctions . . .


A couple of variations on a theme.

The first is 'Z Line':

http://the-ride-info.blogspot.com/2008/08/z-line-introduction.html
http://the-ride-info.blogspot.com/2008/08/z-line-2-limits-on-vision.html
http://the-ride-info.blogspot.com/2008/08/z-line-3-prepared-for-action.html
http://the-ride-info.blogspot.com/2008/08/z-line-4-ouellet.html
http://the-ride-info.blogspot.com/2008/08/z-line-4-how-it-helps.html

The second, for the same circumstance, is weaving:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqQBubilSXU


I prefer the 'Z Line' alternative as it movesyou away from the potentially encroaching vehicle - giving more time for you to react - and means that if you do have to react then the bike is straight and upright for the 'final approach'.


Finally:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-Lav2IOsjE

May I suggest that those of a gentle disposition, or in 'work' or 'home with small children' situation, may wish to mute the sound smile
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#755813 - 01/26/12 09:31 AM Re: Lack of Motion Induced Blindness [Re: doc47]
4wheeldog Offline
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Registered: 06/12/02
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The silk scarves originated in WWI. They were an used in association with goggles, and total loss engine oiling. The scarf was handy to remove the oil from the goggles, thus restoring some semblance of vision.

Keeping one's head on a swivel is good advice always....Even when walking in urban environs. Only when safely in your own house should you relent.

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#755849 - 01/26/12 11:46 AM Re: Lack of Motion Induced Blindness [Re: doc47]
Dave_zoom_zoom Offline
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Registered: 02/23/07
Posts: 624
Loc: British Columbia Canada
Thanks Doc

"Good tip"!

Who knew? Not I!

Thank You

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#755937 - 01/26/12 09:54 PM Re: Lack of Motion Induced Blindness [Re: Horse]
ESokoloff Offline
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Originally Posted By: Horse


So, to make yourself more visible when approaching junctions . . .



The second, for the same circumstance, is weaving:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqQBubilSXU


I came up with the weaving technique when I returned to riding after t-boning a motorist that pulled out on me.
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#755974 - 01/27/12 07:47 AM Re: Lack of Motion Induced Blindness [Re: doc47]
Rocer Offline
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Registered: 10/21/08
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Loc: Haliburton ON
Hi Doc, the concept of constant scanning is (still) used in the training of private / recreational pilots. It's also used in many driver's ed programs as part of their defensive driving techniques.

One of my best driving instructors used to say that if you look in your rearview mirror and are surprised to see a car there or anywhere in your visual periphery then you weren't scanning frequently enough. There's nothing like the feeling of vulnerability when riding a moto to accentuate the need to constantly scan. Thanks for the reminder. Maybe we should buy stock in the silk scarf industry. smile
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#755993 - 01/27/12 09:15 AM Re: Lack of Motion Induced Blindness [Re: Rocer]
upflying Offline
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Registered: 11/10/02
Posts: 6686
Loc: Reno, NV
Originally Posted By: Rocer
Hi Doc, the concept of constant scanning is (still) used in the training of private / recreational pilots. It's also used in many driver's ed programs as part of their defensive driving techniques.

One of my best driving instructors used to say that if you look in your rearview mirror and are surprised to see a car there or anywhere in your visual periphery then you weren't scanning frequently enough. There's nothing like the feeling of vulnerability when riding a moto to accentuate the need to constantly scan. Thanks for the reminder. Maybe we should buy stock in the silk scarf industry. smile

Very true about scanning, also known as situational awareness. If you are doing it correctly there is no need to look over your shoulder for vehicles prior to a lane change. You know from scanning whether there is a vehicle there or not.


Edited by upflying (01/27/12 09:16 AM)
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#756022 - 01/27/12 10:37 AM Re: Lack of Motion Induced Blindness [Re: upflying]
Paul Mihalka Offline
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"If you are doing it correctly there is no need to look over your shoulder for vehicles prior to a lane change. You know from scanning whether there is a vehicle there or not."

Correct, but I still look over my shoulder - just in case...
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